Boost Your Mental Health: 12 Easy Ways to Feel Better

Boost Your Mental Health With A Soothing Bath

#NormalizeMentalHealth. The Covid-19 pandemic has been a doozy and has turned our lives upside down. Many of us are getting burned out with day-to-day tasks, trying to manage families, work, and not getting sick. These unprecedented times can take a toll on our mental health and truly affect our overall wellness.

If you could use a few ways to boost your mental health, here are several I think will help. 

Take mental health days. “I need a day!” There’s nothing wrong if you feel this way. It’s normal, and I think people aren’t being honest if they never needed a break from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. Take a mental health day whenever you feel drained or unable to contribute to the world around you positively. Take a mental health day if life gets the best of you or you need to rest.Go Camping-Boost Your Mental Health

Plan a getaway. During this pandemic, many people are not traveling– however, planning a getaway doesn’t have to be extravagant. Having something to look forward to can have positive effects on your mood and happiness. You can book a cabin or tiny home, go camping, or plan a staycation at a local hotel. Add in a few family or friends and let the good times roll!

Stay active–mentally and physically. Embrace an active lifestyle to improve mental health. This includes a healthy diet, 150 minutes of exercise each week, fun activities like puzzles and board games, and so much more.

Do Puzzles - Boost Your Mental HealthStart journaling. I talk about journaling often and, quite honestly, think it’s underrated and underused. Regardless of if you’re traditional, bullet, or gratitude journaling, it’s a useful tool to acknowledge your feelings. If you’re upset, writing down your experiences can reduce depression symptoms and possibly resolve the issue.

Who’s funny? We all have that one family member or friend who’s hilarious and tells the best stories. Invite them over for dinner or to a Zoom call to catch up and enjoy each other’s company. You can even recruit a funny child, niece, or nephew because we all know kids are hilarious. We need this because laughter reduces anxiety, and we could all use a good laugh from time to time.

Take a relaxing bath. Once a week, relax in a nice, warm bath. Add in Epsom Salt and Lavender Essential Oil to soothe achy muscles and relieve stress. You can even light a candle to increase the ambiance.

Take a nature walk. As long as the weather permits, go for nature walks. Thirty-minute walks/hikes can reduce depression and boost energy. Take time and enjoy the sunshine and the beautiful leaves on the trees.

Focus on self-development. If you need to switch mental gears, there’s no better time to focus on you. With 15 to 30 extra minutes a day, you can set new goals or learn something new or strengthen up a personal area that needs work. Experiment with what you do and don’t like, then dive in!

Try a routine. Having routines can ease stress because the brain doesn’t have to work as hard. Set out your favorite morning mug, prep your lunch and dinner, plan tomorrow’s clothes–whatever makes your day easier and gives you a sense of control.

Eat Walnuts-Boost Your Mental HealthSupport brain health. Keep brain food around. Omega-3 fatty acids are said to decrease depression and schizophrenia symptoms. Incorporate flaxseeds, walnuts, fish oil supplements, or wild-caught salmon into your diet.

Be gentle with yourself. We are in a pandemic. Many of us have experienced various emotions and, at times, don’t know how to feel. We are fearful. We are vulnerable. We are human! If you’ve had these experiences, be gentle with yourself. We are all navigating new waters and trying to make it work. Don’t beat yourself up for the things you haven’t done, acknowledge your feelings, and be thankful for how far you’ve come.

See a professional. There’s nothing wrong with seeing a mental health professional because sometimes we need a little extra help. Seek a professional to work through issues, emotions, and feelings that may be hard to navigate on your own. A good therapist can become a valuable ally.

This blog is also featured on blog.heinens.com!

Share:

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

1 × three =

Related Posts

Nic Discussing Her Caffeine Addiction

My Caffeine Addiction

I’m over the headaches, jitters, lack of focus, and anxiety that all come from my caffeine addiction. Over the last ten years, it has grown